Spontaneous combustion

We were lucky enough to manage a week away during the summer holidays. The beautiful Schoolhouse at Fenwick in Northumberland, just a short car journey away from home, provided a brilliant base for our adventures with absolutely everything we needed. I planned our days based on the experiences of a couple of friends so we could relax and enjoy some time away.

Quinns smiles his biggest smile with a large aeroplane behind him on tarmac.

Although I am a bit of a planner anyway it does get a little frustrating not to be able to be a bit more spontaneous. Earlier in the holiday I discovered when trying to book tickets for an exhibition on a Saturday evening for the Sunday that I couldn’t get a carers ticket because they were only available to those phoning during working hours Monday to Friday. Another unnecessary obstruction on top of everything else for disabled people who need support.

Anyway when we were driving to our holiday I spotted a sign for the National Museum of Flight. A few people had mentioned it to me because of Quinns’ love of planes but I hadn’t done my research nor did I intend to while on holiday. The planning extended to let’s just go on the way home and see what we find. I booked the tickets including a carers ticket online the night before.

As you can imagine for a display that includes aeroplane hangars the site is large. There are disabled parking spaces at each of the buildings and wheelchairs for use by anyone who needs one. As well as large thankfully the site is also very flat and the pathways tarmac which made it easy to get from one building to another so once we were parked up we were ready to explore.

The grounds were full of planes for us to discover. Quinns was immediately very excited to see so many up close. Although we took him on a few flights when he was younger we haven’t quite managed to bring ourselves to again now he’s bigger.

Disappointment came before we even made it to the suggested start of the exhibitions. We couldn’t help but have a closer look at the first plane on route only to realise we could board to see the inside. I stayed with Quinns on the ground while everyone else disappeared up the steps. To be honest I’m not sure he was too bothered about the inside but it wasn’t a good feeling that he was excluded. 

At the desk we were given times when each of the planes would be open to explore. Of course I couldn’t help but ask if any were accessible to wheelchair users. A very confused man simply told me no. I was disappointed but not surprised given the difficulties wheelchair users have with flying as described in this recent Guardian article

Rather than miss out exploring the inside of Concorde with Dad and Big Sister I decided to take copious numbers of photographs to share with Quinns afterwards. Again he was probably more interested in the large screens showing videos of the red arrows in action or Concorde in flight but I couldn’t help wondering why there isn’t more effort to make at least one interior available for wheelchair users who might be interested?

After lunch we went to explore the Fantastic Flight hangar. I was seriously impressed. There were loads of interactive exhibits for children and adults to explore and learn about flight. Quinns was absolutely fascinated by the balloon that filled with air and rose up. Even better, it was operated by a button that he could reach and press himself! He also spent quite a lot of time trying out the controls for operating different parts of the plane. Although he had a good go at all the different levers his favourite was the one that switched the lights on. For someone who often has to sit passively at such places this was amazing!

He was also able to have a good go at the flight simulator but given that his favourite activity was letting the plane crash I think I might leave it a while before he starts flying lessons! 

So our little bit of spontaneity paid off on this occasion. The museum redeemed itself from the immediate disappointment of inaccessibility with interactive installations that Quinns could actually enjoy. However there are no excuses on a site that large not to have a Changing Places toilet which would have made our day even better! 

A week away

We had a brilliant few days away thanks to the beautiful and very accessible Schoolhouse Fenwick. It had everything we needed as a base for our adventures. 😀

Fabulous friends gave us recommendations for what to do in Northumberland based on their own experiences so we had lots of fun without the fuss of inaccessibility!

First up was the Heatherslaw light railway which went from Heatherslaw to Etal where we explored the castle. The train had a couple of wheelchair accessible carriages and it was great to see them both being used. The castle, which is mainly ruin, wasn’t too bad for getting Quinns around in his wheelchair.

Quinns loved the train ride of course, although he learned quickly to cover his ears when the whistle blew!

Quinns is always asking to go swimming so when we heard Berwick Leisure pool had recently been refurbished we knew we had to try it out. Sure enough it has a brilliant Changing Places toilet with access from reception straight through to pool side so no need to drip through public areas while wet! 😀

It also has a Pool Pod Lift (https://tinyurl.com/4yk6x495 ) for accessing the pool. Although the submersible wheelchair didn’t have quite the right support we made it work (he was small enough for his head to be supported by the back of the chair.)

We had to rescue him on the way in as the chair kept going down until he was under the water so he sat on my knee on the way back up for safety.

Beach wheelchairs are a brilliant idea for inclusion!! It’s really difficult to move a wheelchair across sand so it’s great to see more and more beaches with these specifically designed wheelchairs.

We had a fabulous albeit very windy day on Beadnell Beach where Quinns could easily access the whole beach and sea where he was close to Big Sister who thinks she’s a fish! 😆

Our holiday was complete with a sunset boat trip around the Farne Islands. It was amazing getting so close to the wildlife particularly the seals.

Quinns absolutely loved being on the boat! We phoned ahead to check the best time as it needed to be high tide for level access.

Thanks to Serenity Boats for being so helpful, friendly and knowledgeable, it made a wonderful last night for us. 😀

No holiday story of ours is complete without a toilet tale. We managed the week despite a real lack of Changing Places toilets by careful planning and a camp bed in the back of the transit van we took to transport all Quinns’ equipment!

It was brilliant to find a Changing Places toilet in Tesco in Berwick. And one so impressively decorated! Tesco seem to be leading the way on providing these toilets but it would be great if other supermarkets followed suit. 🤞🏻

To boldy go…

Close up of Quinns' tired but happy face. He holds a red curly straw up in his right hand.

With Covid restrictions and several bouts of illness this winter it’s been a while since Quinns has made it to a party. I’m tired from having recently had Covid but I’ve also been watching and reading a lot that’s made me want to speak out more about our experiences so here’s a little glimpse at the emotions that went into one birthday party at a trampoline park.

I’m grateful he’s got friends and has been been invited to the party. I’m thankful that restrictions have lifted and he’s well enough to go. I’m hopeful it’ll go well knowing I have friends ready for action.

I’m delighted at the squeals of excitement that ‘Quinns is here‘. I’m proud of Big Sister supporting her brother on the trampoline. She enjoyed the responsibility and loved chatting to all his friends. I’m relieved it’s not me up there scaring them all away!

I’m sad, angry and disappointed but accepting that I had to change him on a toilet floor. No-one should have to but it’s our reality without a Changing Place toilet. I’m exhilarated by freeing a red emergency cord and adorning it with a Euan’s Guide card.

I’m happy there’s a lift to get him to the party room. Quinns enjoyed the ride while I’m relieved we didn’t get stuck! I’m disappointed there’s not enough space or flexibility for his wheelchair to fit under the table allowing him a space at the table.

I’m happy to see his excited face when he’s given tomato ketchup with his meal. Even happier to see his full on excitement when the amazing birthday cake is brought out and we all sing happy birthday to his friend.

I love that he dipped into his party bag with another friend before proudly holding his red curly straw all the way home.

Thanks for a brilliant party!

“To boldly go where all others have gone before” #ThenBarbaraMetAlan

Caution Wet floor

Even with very little control of his body out of the water Quinns is extremely comfortable and happy in the water.

Quinns is not the only keen swimmer in our family. Big Sister is an aspiring olympic swimmer. Swimming, therefore, is an obvious choice of activity for the four of us to enjoy together. You would like to think it would be easy but it’s not. 

Photo of a sign saying 'Caution Wet Floor' outside a Changing Place Toilet

One of the reasons we chose to live where we live is access to what we thought were really good swimming pools. However we now realise none of the pools close to us are ideal for Quinns. The nearest pool with everything he requires is 20 miles away. 

Since swimming has benefits for people no matter their ability you would think the facilities would be more accessible.

Our local leisure pool has recently put in a Changing Place. That in itself is great but it’s not poolside! I’m not sure how that’s going to work once Quinns is bigger and needs hoisted but for now we can make it work with waterproof mats and towels in the Bug.

Before and after our swim we have to walk right through the public reception area of a busy leisure centre!

I’m not sure who is more uncomfortable when our little family troupe walk soaking wet through a public place but I know for a fact that it is inconvenient for the staff.

World Toilet Day 2019

Photo of Quinns holding Changing Places paper glasses in his hand beside his Big Sister who is holding glasses and moustache up to her face.

As World Toilet day comes around for another year I thought it might be useful to see what progress has been made with Changing Place toilets since my post last year

Lots of you have pointed us in the direction of Changing Place toilets and we’ve tried out as many as possible. We found one in a play park right next to the accessible roundabout and there was a new one in our local swimming pool which allowed us to go swimming together as a family.

They’ve helped us enjoy family time at museums, art galleries and even at safari parks and festivals. On our travels we’ve discovered that there are really advanced ways to flush toilets but we’ve also found adjustable height benches with manual systems! 

I was delighted to book a Mobiloo for a local fundraising event and loved seeing it parked right in the middle of my own community. Its presence raised a huge amount of awareness of the need for these specialised facilities. The fact that it was used a total of 11 times in the three hours it was there speaks volumes. 

Sadly in the past year there has only been one new Changing Place toilet in the whole of our local authority area. I wish that number had been higher but hopefully discussions about new ones are happening right now. I know that some thought has gone into the possibility of a Mobiloo for the area. 

£2 million of government funding has been awarded to 22 motorway service stations in England specifically for Changing Place toilets and details of which ones have now been released. For us that means when we travel, we will be able to stop at our favourite services and not just the one that happens to have the right facilities. 

Photo of Quinns and his Big Sister outside a Changing Place toilet at a service station

Thanks to the strength of the national campaign there has been some legislative change. On the first of December it will become a legal requirement in Scotland for large developments to have a Changing Places toilet to gain planning consent. This is a major step forward to ensuring #incLOOsion happens.

Finally, Tesco is leading the way for supermarkets with its pledge of 35 new Changing Place toilets in stores countrywide. I’m sure the campaign will continue until all supermarkets, train stations, shopping centres, airports etc all have a Changing Place toilet. Something as simple as a Changing Place toilet really does make our everyday lives, even the most mundane of tasks like the weekly shop, that little bit easier.

Photo of Quinns holding a handwritten sign that reads 'Nobody should have to lie on a toilet floor! #ChangingPlaces'