Can you hear me?

I was recently on a course where speakers would present on various topics relating to inclusion. 

Pencil line illustration of a young boy shouting into a microphone.

At the start of one presentation a support person held the microphone to the speaker’s mouth. ‘Can you hear me?’ said the speaker. As we shook our heads the supporter adjusted the microphone. ‘Can you hear me?’ 

Again the answer was no and more adjustments made. ‘Can you hear me?’ This went on for several minutes until finally we could hear the speaker and I can assure you by the time the presentation began we were all listening. 

After that for the duration of the talk the supporter quietly held the microphone to the speakers mouth, only switching arms as required. His job simply to help amplify the speaker’s words.

Knowing how to support someone who is physically disabled can be really difficult. A really fine balance needs to be struck between supporting someone to do something and simply doing it for them. 

I recently helped Quinns make salt dough ornaments. They looked pretty good but my own experience working with dough and icing was obvious. I had taken over. I overstepped the mark of enabling and instead made them for him. I like to think that’s what any mother would do though… 

One evening we were sitting at the table. Quinns had his eye gaze computer in front of him. Big Sister was writing a letter. She finished and passed it to me. I read it to myself and told her how great it was before putting it down beside me. 

Quinns very slowly but carefully picked three words. ‘I. Want. See.’ 

Close up photo of the screen of Quinns' eye gaze computer showing the word and images for I want see in the speech box.

Of course, I had forgotten to show him the letter his sister had been working on. A great reminder that he’s so often passed over. We share things and show each other things all the time. His presence in the room isn’t enough to include him. He needs help to get in on the action either by someone moving him closer and / or helping him with the relevant piece of equipment but at the same time not overstepping the mark. 

Quinns will probably always need help. There are some amazing designs and technologies available that will enable him to do a whole lot but it’s really important that he also gets the right support person. The one who will quietly hold the microphone and allow Quinns’ voice to be heard.

World Toilet Day 2019

Photo of Quinns holding Changing Places paper glasses in his hand beside his Big Sister who is holding glasses and moustache up to her face.

As World Toilet day comes around for another year I thought it might be useful to see what progress has been made with Changing Place toilets since my post last year

Lots of you have pointed us in the direction of Changing Place toilets and we’ve tried out as many as possible. We found one in a play park right next to the accessible roundabout and there was a new one in our local swimming pool which allowed us to go swimming together as a family.

They’ve helped us enjoy family time at museums, art galleries and even at safari parks and festivals. On our travels we’ve discovered that there are really advanced ways to flush toilets but we’ve also found adjustable height benches with manual systems! 

I was delighted to book a Mobiloo for a local fundraising event and loved seeing it parked right in the middle of my own community. Its presence raised a huge amount of awareness of the need for these specialised facilities. The fact that it was used a total of 11 times in the three hours it was there speaks volumes. 

Sadly in the past year there has only been one new Changing Place toilet in the whole of our local authority area. I wish that number had been higher but hopefully discussions about new ones are happening right now. I know that some thought has gone into the possibility of a Mobiloo for the area. 

£2 million of government funding has been awarded to 22 motorway service stations in England specifically for Changing Place toilets and details of which ones have now been released. For us that means when we travel, we will be able to stop at our favourite services and not just the one that happens to have the right facilities. 

Photo of Quinns and his Big Sister outside a Changing Place toilet at a service station

Thanks to the strength of the national campaign there has been some legislative change. On the first of December it will become a legal requirement in Scotland for large developments to have a Changing Places toilet to gain planning consent. This is a major step forward to ensuring #incLOOsion happens.

Finally, Tesco is leading the way for supermarkets with its pledge of 35 new Changing Place toilets in stores countrywide. I’m sure the campaign will continue until all supermarkets, train stations, shopping centres, airports etc all have a Changing Place toilet. Something as simple as a Changing Place toilet really does make our everyday lives, even the most mundane of tasks like the weekly shop, that little bit easier.

Photo of Quinns holding a handwritten sign that reads 'Nobody should have to lie on a toilet floor! #ChangingPlaces'